http://curriculumsystems.uga.edu/curriculum/courses/additional-information-on-submitting-courses
November 20, 2017 11:59 am

Additional Information on Submitting Courses

 

Online Learning (E-Suffix)

The E suffix will be used for online learning (distance education) courses in which more
than 95% is taught online.

When entering your E-suffix course in the CAPA system, click the button next to Online Learning Course as shown below.

CAPA Screen for Entering Course Information


Service Learning (S-Suffix)

If you have any questions concerning Service-Learning courses, please contact the Office of Service-Learning at 542-8924 or osl@uga.edu.

Justification for a course having an “S” suffix should be entered into the Non-Traditional Format Field on the course application. For justification, copy and paste the bulleted paragraph below that is most appropriate for your course.

  • Course includes a service-learning project during the semester that either employs skills or knowledge learned in the course or teaches new skills or knowledge related to course objectives. Student engagement in the service-learning component will be up to 25% of overall instruction time.
  • Course includes a service-learning project during the semester that either employs skills or knowledge learned in the course or teaches new skills or knowledge related to course objectives. Students will be involved in the planning and implementation of the project(s) and may spend time outside of the classroom. Students will be engaged in the service-learning component for approximately 25-50% of overall instructional time.
  • Course includes a service-learning project during the semester that either employs skills or knowledge learned in the course or teaches new skills or knowledge related to course objectives. Students will be involved in the planning and implementation of the projects(s) and may spend time outside of the classroom. Students will be engaged in the service-learning component for approximately 50-75% of overall instructional time.
  • Course includes a service-learning project during the semester that either employs skills or knowledge learned in the course or teaches new skills or knowledge related to course objectives. The course uses service-learning as the primary pedagogical tool for teaching course objectives. Students will work on a comprehensive project(s) and may be required to spend considerable time outside the classroom. Students will be engaged in the service-learning component for approximately 75-100% of overall instructional time.

Make sure to include evidence of service-learning in the Course Objectives and/or Topical Outline section of the course approval form.


Writing Intensive Course (W-Suffix)

Justification for a course having a “W” suffix should be entered in the Non-Traditional Format field using the following language (you may cut and paste the paragraph below):

This version of the course will be taught as writing intensive, which means that the course will include substantial and ongoing writing assignments that a) relate clearly to course learning; b) teach the communication values of a discipline—for example, its practices of argument, evidence, credibility, and format; and c) prepare students for further writing in their academic work, in graduate school, and in professional life. The written assignments will result in a significant and diverse body of written work (the equivalent of 6000 words or 25 pages) and the instructor (and/or the teaching assistant assigned to the course) will be closely involved in student writing, providing opportunities for feedback and substantive revision.

In the either the “Course Objectives” or “Topical Outline” field, indicate what kinds of writing assignments will be assigned and how they will be distributed throughout the course of the semester.

Please see below for a full explanation/definition of writing intensive. If you have any questions regarding writing intensive courses, please contact Dr. Elizabeth Davis at 542-2679 or eadavis@uga.edu.

Writing intensive courses will exhibit considerable variation across disciplines in terms of the types of writing assigned, but all make writing important to the thinking of the course, give students opportunities to write in low stakes and high stakes situations, and engage students in conversations about writing. For a course to be designated as writing intensive, the following principles must be reflected in the course design:

  1. Writing is an ongoing activity throughout the course and is part of the process of learning content.
    The course includes substantial and ongoing writing assignments that a) relate clearly to course learning; b) teach the communication values of a discipline—for example, its practices of argument, evidence, credibility, and format; and c) prepare students for further writing in their academic work, in graduate school, and in professional life.
  2. Writing assignments take a variety of forms appropriate to the course and the discipline.
    Written assignments may be formal and count for a considerable portion of the grade for the course (high stakes), or informal and less important in the grading schema (low stakes). A course that is designated as writing intensive should include both high and low stakes writing assignments done both in and out of class, resulting in a significant and diverse body of written work (the equivalent of 6000 words or 25 pages of formal and informal writing distributed over the course of the semester).
  3. Students learn to write effectively by having opportunities to receive feedback from their instructors and peers in order to revise their writing as it progresses through a series of stages.
    Writing assignments are broken into segments that teach the process of effective writing in a field and involve students in the composing process. Faculty and teaching assistants are closely involved in student writing, and opportunities for feedback and substantive revision are offered.
  4. Writing intensive classes with a one-hour lab co-requisite (optional).
    In order to reflect and reward the extensive amount of work that both students and faculty do in a writing intensive course, departments may design writing lab courses (to be offered either face-to-face or as e-courses) that can be added on to existing courses in order to provide an additional fourth credit hour. These add-on course components can be used for individual conferencing, peer review, revising and editing, and exercises to develop writing skills.